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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

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So far Joshua Wylie has created 30 blog entries.

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Friendship Jr. College Founders Day Featured Groundbreaking Ceremony

The 121st Founders Day celebration for Friendship Junior College was held May 19, 2012 at the Mount Prospect Baptist Church, 339 West Black St., Rock Hill, South Carolina.  The Reverend Doctor A.C. Robinson (Class of 1966), pastor of the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, Marion, South Carolina was the Founders Day Speaker. This Founders Day celebration [...]

Leaders

March 7, 1961: Rev. Ivory constructs a mass meeting to honor the Friendship 9 students that were released. He had CORE member James Farmer speak. It was an held to celebrate and praise the actions the boys and show them that what they had done was not for naught. Not only were they heroes in [...]

Students

Students continued to picket, protest, sit-in and refuse bail in Rock Hill, and other towns across the South did the same. A lot were successful in achieving integration at the lunch counters, but not all were. In fact, some lunch counters closed their doors for good due to the sit-in movement, while others dragged their [...]

Press

February 18, 1961: The headline “Jail Yes, Bail No” was published on the front page of The Baltimore Afro-American followed by a slew of protests going on inspired with the new fire of what the Friendship 9 demonstrated. The two “convict” protestors from Washington D.C. were pictured on the front page in this issue. The [...]

Leaders

February 23, 1961: Three adult leaders in the community, Rev. Ivory along with George A. Hackley and Paul David Deitrich, were arrested for breach of the peace while protesting in downtown Rock Hill. Even though the Civil Rights protestors all practiced peacefully, this charge was handed out a lot of “breach of the peace” in [...]

Students

February 17, 1961: Winthrop University is now a co-ed, integrated institution, but this was not the case prior to 1964. 19 African American Friendship College women were inspired by the audacity and bravery of the their fellow Friendship College peers that they picketed outside of Winthrop College for the right to apply. At this time, [...]

March 2, 1961

Just two days shy of serving their full sentence, The Friendship 9 was let out of York County Prison Farm early. The reason was not because of good behavior, or that the system saw their mistake and this was an apology. Instead, they let them out early so that the press would not be able [...]

February 18, 1961

The Friendship 9, at this point, had served more than half of their time at the Prison Camp before the authorities found a reason to put them in solitary confinement. The reasons are not as clear as the newspapers said as to why they were confined, but none of the reasons were reasonable. Some newspapers [...]

February 1-2, 1961

After the ten were arrested, they spent the night in the Rock Hill jail before they were put on trial on February 1, 1961. Reverend Cecil Ivory, who was the Rock Hill representative for the NAACP, took it upon himself to get the students a well-respected African American attorney to represent them. He got one [...]